Tuesday, September 16, 2008

"India has become the first country to convict someone of a crime relying on evidence from... a brain scanner":
The woman, Aditi Sharma, was accused of killing her former fiancé, Udit Bharati. They were living in Pune when Sharma met another man and eloped with him to Delhi. Later Sharma returned to Pune and, according to prosecutors, asked Bharati to meet her at a McDonald's. She was accused of poisoning him with arsenic-laced food.

...After placing 32 electrodes on Sharma's head, investigators said, they read aloud their version of events, speaking in the first person ("I bought arsenic;" "I met Udit at McDonald's"), along with neutral statements like "The sky is blue," which help the software distinguish memories from normal cognition.

For an hour, Sharma said nothing. But the relevant nooks of her brain where memories are thought to be stored buzzed when the crime was recounted, according to Joseph, the state investigator. The judge endorsed Joseph's assertion that the scans were proof of "experiential knowledge" of having committed the murder, rather than just having heard about it.
(Via /.)